Five shifts to empower your teenagers to become self-led adults Shift #4 – Creator to Co-Creator

Five shifts to empower your teenagers to become self-led adults Shift #4 – Creator to Co-Creator

The last few weeks we have been looking at five shifts to make that will help empower your teenager to become mature, healthy self-led adults. We have looked at Shift #1: Talker to Listener, Shift #2: Center to Side and Shift #3 – Causal Interaction to a Conversation with Purpose.  As a reminder, I am not an expert in parenting. But I have learned a thing or two about coaching and helping people take action towards the direction God has designed for them in life and ministry.  Also, these five shifts are not limited to parenting. They relate to working with teenagers in youth groups or wherever you’re connecting with people in meaningful ways to help them take the next step on their journey to follow Jesus’ mission for their life. Let me give a bit of background so you have some context.

Shift #4: Creator to Co-Creator 

In our last post, I shared that my wife and I attempted to use a coach approach whenever we could while raising our kids. Starting very early, we did our best to listen and ask questions when the situation warranted it, as opposed to telling them what to do all the time. We wanted them to be able to process the world around them for themselves and make their own decisions… while providing guidance when necessary. 

This led to some very interesting conversations during their teenage years. One of the most invigorating conversations we shared independently with both kids was the lingering question – “What are you doing upon graduation?” Of course, it was never so eloquent or overt; but part of the answer was that in the case of both kids, college was clearly their next step. At least we understood the vision. Getting down to the goals and action steps were more nuanced depending on which child we are discussing.

Our oldest was a bit more reluctant to enter the college application process. It took a bit more finesse to engage him in setting his goal and action necessary to apply.  But apply it he did, and the rest is, well, very cool indeed.

Our youngest was very clear on her goal and how to get there. Not a lot of coaching was necessary until it came to the dreaded “loan tolerance” conversation. Needless to say, I did the heavy lifting running the numbers to reflect on the three options in consideration. She chose wisely. Made the choice that made the most strategic, financially responsible and practical sense.

Below is a simple framework of the things we did to help our teenagers co-create their agenda.

 Mini-Shifts:

  • Release the need to control the agenda
    • Internally, align your agenda with the Holy Spirit’s agenda.
  • Allow the other person to set an agenda
    • Connect and allow the new disciple to reflect.
  • Engage the other person to set the agenda
    • Ask: “What do you want at the end that you don’t have now?”

Real – time Actions:

·       Ask the your teenager to clarify their “win”.


Below are two opportunities that can help you refine your disciple-coach skills!

5 Disciple Coach Habits webinar – Monday, October 11 from 10-3 PST

CLICK HERE

Cost: $250.00

The full package includes the webinar AND triad sessions:

CLICK HERE

Cost: $475.00

Empower your teenagers to become self-led adults: Shift #3 – Causal Interaction to a Conversation with Purpose

Empower your teenagers to become self-led adults: Shift #3 – Causal Interaction to a Conversation with Purpose

The last few weeks we have been looking at five shifts to make that will help empower your teenager to become mature, healthy self-led adults. We have looked at Shift #1: Talker to Listener and Shift #2: Center to Side.  As a reminder, I am not an expert in parenting. But I have learned a thing or two about coaching and helping people take action towards the direction God has designed for them in life and ministry.  Also, these five shifts are not limited to parenting. They relate to working with teenagers in youth groups or wherever you’re connecting with people in meaningful ways to help them take the next step on their journey to follow Jesus’ mission for their life. Let me give a bit of background so you have some context.

Shift #3: Causal Interaction to a Conversation with Purpose

One of the things we did very early with our kids was to use a coach approach whenever we could. Simply put – we used listening and asking questions versus telling. Of course, a parent must tell their child not to touch the hot stove or they can be seriously injured, but on other occasions, if the situation warranted, we tried to apply coaching technology.

This led to some very interesting conversations during their teenage years. Due to the location of our home we had three viable high school options within a 7 minute drive (10 minutes if we were in traffic). Early on in the decision-making process we decided each school was viable, had solid academics and comparable extra-curricular activities. I imagine, these are the primary priorities most parents consider when considering a public school. We had good, healthy and sometimes tense conversations about what school the kids wanted to attend. We agreed that this was a decision the kids would make. We were deliberate, discerning and prayed for wisdom along the way.  

I liked the newest campus because it had all the bells and whistles that a new school in 2010 should have. Gina liked another school in particular because they offered the International Baccalaureate (IB) program.  However, the kids preferred the largest school of the three: it offered the most dual enrollment courses, had the most Advanced Placement (AP) offerings and they had an amazing principal who was the founding leader with a stellar record. I discovered that dual enrollment credits transfer directly over to college which could save up to a year of tuition (I really appreciated their logic). It wasn’t the most attractive of the three options but it was not in any way deficient – so we went with this option.  

Here are the things we did to move from a causal interaction to a conversation with purpose.

Key Question: How can I establish high trust?

Mini-Shifts:

  • Build a trusting environment
    • Empathy conveys that you feel what the other is feeling
  •  Adopt a coaching process
    • Make their agenda your agenda and help them clarify a step.
  • Engage with your teen
    • Help them tap into their intrinsic motivation.

Below are two opportunities that can help you refine your disciple-coach skills!

5 Disciple Coach Habits webinar – Monday, October 11 from 10-3 PST

CLICK HERE

Cost: $250.00

The full package includes the webinar AND triad sessions:

CLICK HERE

Cost: $475.00

Empower your teenagers to become self-led adults Shift #2 – Center to Side

Empower your teenagers to become self-led adults Shift #2 – Center to Side

Recently, we have been looking at five shifts to make that will help empower your teenager to become mature, healthy self-led adults. Last week, we looked at the Shift #1: Talker to listener. Shift two is all about moving from the center of their lives and decision-making to the side. As a reminder, I am not an expert in parenting. But I have learned a thing or two about coaching and helping people take action towards the direction God has designed for them in life and ministry.  Also, these five shifts are not limited to parenting. They relate to working with teenagers in youth groups or wherever you’re connecting with people in meaningful ways to help them take the next step on their journey to follow Jesus’ mission for their life. Let me give a bit of background so you have some context.

Shift #2 – Center to Side

One of the things we did very early with our kids was to involve them in sports. When we lived in Phoenix, Gina and I coached their respective “recreation”  soccer teams. We lived in the city and the rec leagues were designed for all kids to participate regardless of athletic ability or economic situation. Our son played one summer of T-ball and we asked him not to play again (the summer heat even for an early game was suffocating) and later basketball  BTW – both kids are athletic and our son is a very quick learner so new sports came easy for him. They enjoyed sports.  

When we relocated to Southern California we graduated from rec leagues to competitive soccer.  What the kids gained were nicer uniforms, higher calibre of coaching and players with a bit more skill. What they lost was the fun factor! For me (playing competitive soccer most of my life through my sophomore year in college at a NCAA Div I program) and Gina (elite gymnast and field hockey player in Australia with the additional bonus of studying kinesiology at university) – we had to make a hard decision and consider: Was this about us or the kids?

Our response to that question led us down the path of understanding what we cared about and hoped to instill in our kids.  So we made the hard decision to tell the kids that they did not have to play a competitive sport; but in exchange they had to remain active. That meant, regular body movement. We died to ourselves and helped the kids discover activities they were passionate about!

We took ourselves out of the center and moved to the side!

This meant we had to become like Barnabas. What we discovered was that we were able to dedicate the time we had given to all-weekend tournaments and engage with the kids on hikes, camping and exploring various activities like rock climbing, mountain biking and swimming together. Today, they continue to be curious about the outdoors, learning new activities like trail running and walking the streets to explore new parts of the city while testing their skills and levels of fitness with new activities.  This was the vision of what we wanted for our kids back when we made the difficult decision of making this about them – not about us.

Here are some of the things we did to make this shift in the way we parented our teenagers.

Key Question: How can I resist the temptation to force my agenda and be attuned to the other person’s agenda?

 Mini-Shifts:

  •       Sacrifice your need to be the center of the conversation

o   Make your teenager the focus of the conversation.

  •       Support your teenager to discover their next step

o   Facilitate the discovery of a step for your teen to take responsibility.

  •       Put your assumptions, opinions, and biases in the background

o   Resist the temptation to make judgements and remain curious.


Following are two opportunities that can help you refine your disciple-coach skills!

5 Disciple Coach Habits webinar – Monday, October 11 from 10-3 PST

CLICK HERE

Cost: $250.00

The full package includes the webinar AND triad sessions:

CLICK HERE

Cost: $475.00

Five shifts to empower your teenagers to become self-led adults Shift #1 – Talker to Listener

Five shifts to empower your teenagers to become self-led adults Shift #1 – Talker to Listener

We are fast approaching the Fall. Some parents are dreading the upcoming school year. Others are relieved. Not too long ago we were parenting our two high school age children through this exciting phase in their development. Today our children are in their early to mid-twenties and together, we have grown into new ways of communicating – both parents and young adults.  

I will share five shifts we made when we encountered these dynamic years with our two children.  Right off the top; I am not an expert in parenting. But I have learned a thing or two about coaching and helping people take action towards the direction God has designed for them in life and ministry. Second, these five shifts are not limited to parenting. They relate to working with teenagers in youth groups or wherever you’re connecting with people in meaningful ways to help them take the next step on their journey to follow Jesus’ mission for their life. I found that I had a multitude of examples of these shifts while empowering my teenagers to become self-led adults. 

Shift #1 – Talker to Listener

One of the things we did very early with our kids was introduce the idea of internships.  Whatever their interests were, we connected them with people we knew and respected in that particular field.  We had both kids in summer internships by the time they entered high school.  This was important for their development because it gave them a sense of responsibility, curiosity and confidence.

To learn about the kids’ interests, we had to be disciplined in our interactions. We forced ourselves not to react when we heard “surprising” developments about what they experienced at school that day with a classmate, or what a teacher said that might have been taken out of context or the latest slang terminology. Instead of reacting we responded with – “tell me more?”  Sounds simple. And it is in theory. Try it next time you interact with your teenager.

Our eldest was interested in finance. His first internship was with a real estate broker. The broker saw that our son was a fast learner. By the end of that summer our son had processed the paper-work for a $1million loan (under the watchful eye of the broker).  What did this do for our son?  He discovered certain parts of the job he enjoyed, others he did not enjoy as much and still others that were necessary but not his passion.  

Our youngest wanted to work in a pediatric physical therapy clinic. The children were on a spectrum of mild to severe disabilities. As a young teen, my daughter supported the work of the therapists, and interacted with the patients and parents. Similar to our son, she learned a number of lessons that she stored in her memory banks for her future schooling and career choices.

Bottom line! To get the kids to the place from the conception of an internship it began with a curiosity in the work, which progressed to an interest to the point of taking action. These steps were all necessary and important to enter into a work environment as an intern. Our part – listen to the processing they were going through in their heads until they came to a point of taking action.  

Here is a simple framework that helps breakdown Shift #1 – Talker to Listener.

Assume a Listening Posture

Key Question: How can I ignore my tendency to share my wisdom and seek to listen?

 Mini-Shifts:

  •       Take the posture of a learner

o   A coach must believe that they don’t know it all.

  •       Remain silent

o   Stay in a quiet place while your son or daughter processes what they sense the Holy Spirit is saying to them.

  •       Be patient

o   Actively remain in a non-anxious state

 Real – time Actions:

  •       Summarize

o   Without contaminating what your son or daughter is processing

  •       Ask the other person “Is there more?”

o   No other question is needed at this time


Following are two opportunities that can help you refine your disciple-coach skills!

5 Disciple Coach Habits webinar – Monday, October 11 from 10-3 PST

CLICK HERE

Cost: $250.00

The full package includes the webinar AND triad sessions:

CLICK HERE

Cost: $475.00

5 Disciple Coach Habits

5 Disciple Coach Habits

If you are one of our followers who has taken the Disciple Coach Quiz, processed the results with us and passed it along to your own disciples, you might be wondering what you can do next. How can you utilize your Quiz results even further? Discipleship is a life-long journey, and wherever you are on that path, there is always a next step; a way to grow and bear more fruit, a way to deepen your relationship with God and others.

If you still haven’t taken our FREE Disciple Coach Quiz, CLICK HERE.

For those who are looking for a next step, we are offering a webinar on the 5 habits of a Disciple Coach. This webinar, like our inaugural webinar in November 2020, will be led by InFocus’s Executive Director, Gary Reinecke, and long-time InFocus partner Micah Dodson. This webinar is a great way to follow up on your newfound insights after you have taken the quiz and can help further deepen your understanding of Discipleship and hone in on the habits of a Disciple Coach. We will help you clarify your missional values, activate prayer, make relational connections and strategic partnerships, while learning how to create your own  Disciple making Cycle. 

Check out the 5 Disciple Coach Habits training coming up October 11 – CLICK HERE!

In addition to the 5-hour webinar, we are also offering personal triad sessions following the webinar. In these sessions Gary or Micah will work closely with you and another Disciple Coach on your team, processing the webinar, working through your personal strengths and weaknesses, and discover your own unique and most effective way of making disciples. These five sessions of fifty-five minutes will help you to develop yourself and the future leaders around you!

5 Disciple Coach Habits webinar – Monday, October 11 from 10-3 PST

CLICK HERE

Cost: $250.00

The full package includes the webinar AND triad sessions:

CLICK HERE

Cost: $475.00

 

8 QUESTIONS TO FOSTER ACCOUNTABILTY AS A DISCIPLE COACH

8 QUESTIONS TO FOSTER ACCOUNTABILTY AS A DISCIPLE COACH

God has given us a personal mission to make disciple in our life in our own unique way, however… we don’t need to tackle that mission on our own! The Lord created us to be relational beings. We are meant to help each other strengthen our faith and grow as people. We need each other, especially when it comes to working through our mission. Partnerships keep us on the paths we’re meant to be, pursuing the mission that God gave us. When alone, it is easy to wander and to get distracted or discouraged.

Jesus understood the importance of working with others. He sent His disciples out in pairs to minister together, and encouraged them to debrief their experience when they returned. Jesus understood the importance of learning through experience, obedience and accountability, and knew they needed to learn to rely on each other because he wouldn’t be with them forever. Jesus trusted that they had what they needed to further the mission to make more and better disciples: strategic partnerships with one another and the Holy Spirit. Proverbs 27:17 tells us, “as iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another.” We can, and should, rely on each other, trust each other and grow together.

Accountability is essential in making and coaching disciples, and strategic partnerships answer the question: “Who will help me stay on mission?” Finding others around you who are making and coaching disciples as well, can help. Like the original disciples, having a partner to debrief experiences, discuss struggles and, most importantly, hold each other accountable. These relationships provide accountability, with grace, to the important actions that will support the newest disciples on their spiritual journey. Accountability helps the disciple coach keep the main thing the main thing, learn from real experience and stay in motion.

There are many ways to practice accountability. You can practice on your own (a great skill to build, but the hardest to hold yourself to), with a coach and with God.

  1. Accountability with yourself
    • How am I prioritizing life events as a disciple coach?
    • What am I not doing that I know I should be doing?
  2.  Accountability with a partner
    • What do you do to process missed opportunities as a disciple coach?
    • How do you celebrate your progress when you act as a disciple coach?
    • What do you do to process setbacks with a disciple when their good intentions don’t    produce the intended fruit?
    • What progress are you observing with the disciples you are coaching on a monthly, quarterly, and annual basis?
  3. Accountability with God
    • What are you learning about God?
    • How do you know when you are doing the things God has called you to do as a disciple coach?

If you still haven’t taken our FREE Disciple Coach Quiz, CLICK HERE.

Check out the 5 Disciple Coach Habits training coming up October 11 – CLICK HERE!

6 QUESTIONS TO REIMAGINE YOUR DISCIPLE MAKING CYCLE

6 QUESTIONS TO REIMAGINE YOUR DISCIPLE MAKING CYCLE

In Jesus’ ministry, he always met people where they were on their journey towards the Lord. Look at the disciples; before He asked his disciples to follow Him, each disciple was at a different place in their lives and their faith… wherever they were, that is exactly where Jesus started discipling them. He began the discipleship process before they were even aware of it; in the harvest. 

We all have our own story of how we came to follow Jesus, and we will have taken different paths to reach where we are today. All our journeys are unique to who God designed us to be; but there are certain critical elements that are always the same in the process; that is the discipleship cycle. We can see clearly that Jesus had a method in his mission to make disciples:

  • STEP 1 – “I do – you watch.”
  • STEP 2 – “You do – I watch.”
  • STEP 3 – “You do – someone else watches.”

Jesus used this simple method to make disciples who made disciples. He understood that everything He did was reproduced in the lives of His disciples from the day he met them. Jesus’ mission was to catalyze disciple making movements through his disciples. He modeled the inner work of being a disciple and the outer work of making disciples. This cycle is the key to multiplying the Kingdom of God. It means we are making disciples that will make disciples, who will make more disciples. 

Real-life Journey

My friend Glenn shared the following about his journey:

I have several friends that I consider to be accountability partners. They help me grow in my faith and hold myself to the standards that God would want of me. We spend a lot of our focus on discipleship and how to become better disciple coaches. As I became more aware of, and committed to, developing relationships with people who don’t yet have a spiritual connection with Christ, we were thrilled to see people growing in faith and being added to our discipleship group. It was exciting to see this progress, yet although this process was reproducible, our efforts were only additive. We shifted our approach to the framework of a “cycle” and are now seeing our efforts multiply. For example, one of our initial group members is branching out to start a Hispanic discipleship team, reaching a group of people that would be almost impossible for me to reach. It is exciting to see where the multiplication effect takes us next!

Reflection Questions: 

  1. Who have you shared your disciple-making cycle with in the last 90 days?
  2. If you haven’t shared your disciple-making cycle recently, what is getting in the way?
  3. What changes do you need to make to your disciple-making cycle?
  4. How transferable is your discipleship cycle?
  5. Who have you discipled that is using your cycle with other disciple coaches?
  6. What elements need to be refined further or added to make your cycle more transferable?

If you still haven’t taken our FREE Disciple Coach Quiz, CLICK HERE.

Check out the 5 Disciple Coach Habits training coming up October 11 – CLICK HERE!

3 Questions to strengthen your Relational Connections

3 Questions to strengthen your Relational Connections

Relational connections are really the foundation of discipleship. God created us as relational beings, we thrive when making connections, and are at our best when we feel supported and loved. A relationship between a disciple and their teacher can be a life-long and powerful connection, but it always just starts with simply getting to know each other. From the relationships we make, we can build true friendships and from friendships, discipleship can grow. 

So let’s think about our friendships: When it comes to our Christian friends versus our non-Christian friends, it is easy to emphasize the importance of one over the other. What normally happens when a new Christian follows Jesus, is their relationships with “outsiders” begin to shrink while their relationships with “insiders” begins to expand. We only have a finite amount of time and it’s easiest to spend it with the people who already fit within our normal routines. When looking to disciple others, it seems natural and easy to draw from those who fit neatly into your life already. It’s all well and good to draw from your Christian community (we all need a mentor at certain points in our lives!) but where we really need to begin is outside of the walls of the church; with our friends who don’t fit so neatly into our lives. After all, we can’t share the good news with people who already know it!

If you realize that you have very few non-Christian friends, you can start with building meaningful relationships with people that God has already placed in your life. We should intentionally be looking to disciple people different from us; people who believe differently, and live different lifestyles. These connections build bridges, not just between yourself and your disciple, but between larger communities; plus we have more of a chance for growth within ourselves, than if we stick to what we know. As we begin to enter a less familiar world and build relationships with people who make choices we might not choose, who think in ways we don’t, we can fall into judgement very quickly. It is necessary to remember we all have our own path to Jesus. We’ve all struggled with doubt, we’ve all given into temptations. We are not there to judge. We are there to seek to understand. All healthy relationships are built on respect and authenticity. Building relationships is not a job or task; it’s just about letting God work through you in the natural relationships you already have.

Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  • Who are you intentionally forming discipleship relationships with in your life?
  • Where in your life could you develop authentic relationships with not-yet Christians?
  • What skills do you need to develop and apply to move your relationship or friendship forward to discipleship?

If you still haven’t taken our FREE Disciple Coach Quiz, CLICK HERE.

Check out the 5 Disciple Coach Habits training coming up October 11 – CLICK HERE!

 

3 ACTIONS TO STRENGTHEN YOUR SPIRITUAL IMPACT AS A DISCIPLE COACH

3 ACTIONS TO STRENGTHEN YOUR SPIRITUAL IMPACT AS A DISCIPLE COACH

One of the most vital and often overlooked elements of discipleship is prayer. Of course, as Christians, we know that prayer is important; it’s significance is repeated over and over in the Bible, by our pastors and our entire Christian community, but it can be so easy to fall into the pattern of passive prayer: that is prayer we do out of obligation or habit, without thinking or connecting.

Learn about the Disciple Coach Quiz – CLICK HERE!

For many of us, prayer happens at particular times of the day; before bed or dinner; maybe you pray first thing in the morning. Maybe you even carve out time intentionally every now and then, but even in your intentional time, it can begin to feel like a chore; some words to say before moving on with your day. We need to remember that prayer is our deepest and most personal way to connect to Jesus. It’s our lifeline to God and can be one of our strongest tools for finding disciples; we pray for them to come into our lives and trust that God will send them our way.

If you still haven’t taken our FREE Disciple Coach Quiz, take it HERE!

Incredible things can happen when we turn passive prayer into active prayer; that is, prayer done with intention, with engagement and love for our Lord and for the people in our lives. I had a friend who had been intentionally building relationships with non-Christians, but there hadn’t been any fruit in quite a while. After a brief conversation with him he stopped and prayed for those he was in relationship with. That day one of the individuals called him out of the blue and wanted to meet to talk about this “Jesus thing”. It is easy to just slide these and other examples into the coincidence bucket, but the Bible shows us the power of prayer and its ability to change lives.

This next week, here are a few things you can pray for to jumpstart your intentional time with the Lord:

  1. Pray for yourself… that you can be who God needs you to be. That you will be blessed with a heart and mind for the lost, that translates to compassion and action.
  2. Prayer for those God is leading your way. We can pray they are open to the touch of the Holy Spirit and responsive to our actions.
  3. Pray for two random people you encounter each day. Pray for God to fill them with wisdom and understanding: for the things of God. Pray that God uses you to love them, in whatever capacity he desires (from a prayer and a smile to becoming a friend). They may be a Christian, they may not, but they are all God’s children.

Also coming up: a new webinar on 5 Disciple Coach Habits. It will take place Monday, September 13 from 10-3 PST. Get tickets HERE!

Look into our full webinar package with five triad sessions, following the webinar. Get tickets HERE!

 

Missional Values – knowing and understanding your personal values and living them out through consistent behavior

Missional Values – knowing and understanding your personal values and living them out through consistent behavior

Missional Values ask the question: Why do you love God, love your neighbor and make disciples?

Have you ever been at work, or at church, or chatting with a friend and you realize that you just said or did something differently than you would do if you were someplace else? Maybe you realized that you truly value honest relationships in your personal life, but when you’re at work, you can’t seem to be able to share important truths about yourself. Maybe you are an incredibly invested parent, but you can’t seem to work up that enthusiasm in church. It can look a million different ways.

Our friend and partner on the Discipleship Guides and Quiz, Glenn Spyksma, shares his experience with incongruent values. 

Glenn’s experience:

I went through this realization myself not too long ago. One of my values is “people development”, or wanting to see people become all that God intends for them to be. I felt like I was living this out at work but at church, I struggled to help people in this way. It wasn’t that things were different at work and church… my values were different. My values were in conflict with each other and I realized that I would find myself having to change my identity depending on the situation. This inspired me to really consider what my truest and deepest values were. 

I began by looking back on my life and considering consistent themes (positive and negative). I thought about influential people in my life, circumstances that shaped me, events that encouraged new ways of thinking and behaving. Next, I identified lessons learned…

For example, one of my values is “people development”, or wanting to see people become all that God intends for them to be. At work, this was played out through training classes, mentoring, coaching, and creating a freedom for upward mobility driven by personal accomplishment.  But at church I struggled to find a way to help people like I did at work. It was frustrating. I felt like I was able to live out my value of “people development” at work but not in my church. I was not living a life that was congruent. I was being authentic to who God created me to be at work, but not at church. It wasn’t that things were different at work and church… my values were different. I was not being true to myself. This caused incredible frustration  because my values were in conflict with each other and I would find myself having to change my identity depending on the situation.  I wanted to discover my life values; my true and deepest values, and then align them with my behavior in  everything I did. But where did I begin?  Self evaluation can be difficult. If you find yourself, like me, weighing what you truly value, start with your most important, clear behaviors. For me that came down to love God, love others and make disciples.

Do you also feel the need to clarify your values? Follow in Glenn’s steps:

  1. Begin by looking back at your life to identify themes, influential people, circumstances that shaped you, or events that encouraged new ways of thinking and behaving.
  2. Identify lessons learned. 
  3. Identify values from these lessons
  4. Now take 5 minutes and go back through and reexamine if your values are things, you value or life values.  Modify your list, as necessary.
  5. Create three columns by each of your values.  Maybe start with the three you see as most important to you. This can be whatever you see as the main areas to examine your values in. At the top of a column write Church, Work, Home, Playing
    Sports or whatever you see as three areas to examine your values in. Begin to examine how you live out each value in the three areas. This is only for you, so be truthful!

So what did you observe? How can you change your actions to be consistent with your highest values in all areas of life? Tomorrow, as you go about your day, be especially mindful of your new and improved list of values… you will be surprised at how it changes your day and makes you feel more at peace with yourself. 

About Glenn: Glenn is a semi-retired Operations Executive formerly with The Wine Group. He has also worked with colleagues in the operations and engineering arena developing people and systems for large brands like Campbell Soup and Chef Boyardee among others. Glenn has always had one foot in the church and one foot in the marketplace. He is an avid church-goer and involved in church leadership.

If you still haven’t taken our FREE Disciple Coach Quiz, take it HERE!

Coaching Guides expand on the habits and are part of a follow-up Zoom call after you take the quiz.

Also coming up: a new webinar on 5 Disciple Coach Habits. It will take place Monday, September 13 from 10-3 PST. Get tickets HERE!

Look into our full webinar package with five triad sessions, following the webinar. Get tickets HERE!