Hungry like Pep Guardiola

Hungry like Pep Guardiola

Last week I introduced three virtues of a coachable person based on Patrick Lencioni’s book entitled: The Ideal Team Player. The three virtues: Hungry-Humble-Smart are also wonderful traits of a coachable person. I will address each of these in the upcoming blogs beginning with the trait of a “hungry” person.

In case you missed it, Pep Guardiola led Manchester City to the English Premiership title last weekend. To no one’s surprise, the club completed the feat with 6 games remaining in the season. This gives them the chance to accumulate the most points ever during the course of a single season – and chances are, “Pep” will see his team reach that goal.

Beyond his desire to win is a relentless thirst to learn and be a student of the game so that he can find new ways to surprise his opponents. He is regarded as THE BEST manager in the game of football (soccer) today – and perhaps of all time. *He was the third of four children born to Valenti Guardiola, a bricklayer, and Dolors Sala and raised in a working-class home with solid family principles and a clear sense of dignity.  His unquenchable thirst drives him to succeed, challenge his players and feed the wild beast within.

*If you are interested in reading more about Pep Guardiola here is the link to an article highlighting his journey that created his incredible appetite and work ethic.

When identifying leaders to coach, having a hunger to learn, continually improve and achieve, is critical to a fruitful coaching relationship. Nothing is more inspiring than a person who has the desire, that drive and grit to grind it out when hard work is required. This hunger will drive the agenda for many a coaching relationship.

Consider the people you are currently developing, assess each by their willingness to word hard using a 3-point scale

  1. Low = lacks drive
  2. Medium = solid work ethic
  3. High = crushes it at every opportunity

Now consider people you want, or should be developing, using the same scale.

What new insights do you have?

If you would like to process this further, please e-mail office@infocusnet.org to schedule a complimentary, 25 minute coaching conversation with Gary Reinecke.

Two weeks before we launch the Discipleship Collective

Two weeks before we launch the Discipleship Collective

In case you missed the Disciplemaking Collective Overview and would like the view it – click here.

Two weeks from today we launch the Disciple Collective on Monday, April 2 @ 3:30pm PST, 6:30pm EST.  The Collective is designed for a pastor, church planter or lay person who is serious about making disciples but could use a more comprehensive approach combined with the relational support of a coach.  If you have someone in your team, congregation and/or network that fits this description, please forward this blog to them:

Three qualities of a Disciplemaking Collective participant:

  1. Hungry – engaged in the Harvest.
  2. Humble – eager to learn.
  3. Smart – emotionally aware.

These qualities were identified in The Ideal Team Player by Patrick Lencioni; and provide a helpful description of who would make a good candidate for the Disciplemaking Collective.

How is coaching different?

How is coaching different?

Leaders want to know what is different about coaching.

I was asked this question recently and I gave my standard answers – click here.  I like the illustration of wearing hats. When I am using a coach approach I have my “coaching hat” on. But when the focus shifts to another approach like counselor, adviser, teacher or mentor; I should be aware the leader may not see the shift they are asking me to make OR, that they may need help finding the assistance they really need OR, explain that I am willing to switch my “coaching” hat for some other hat.

The clearer we can be, the more confident people become when the shift occurs during a conversation. This is especially helpful when using a coach approach in disciplemaking and church planting/multiplication to avoid confusion, for the coach and the person being coached. I found the chart illustrated in Sending Well: A Field Guide to Great Church Planter Coaching by Dino Sinesi – to be extremely helpful to make the distinctions between coaching and other people-helping approaches. He breaks down the different roles in three categories: Function, Key Word & Scripture.

Here are the Roles with the Function and Key Word describing the outcome each role provides:

  • Counselor: ER DoctorRelief
  • Advisor: Auto MechanicSolutions
  • Teacher: LibrarianInformation
  • Mentor: Personal TrainerImitation
  • Coach: Taxi DriverService

Reflect on these for a moment.

Below are three questions to help you clarify what approach is needed, and if you need to change your “coaching hat”…

  1. What kind of assistance is the leader/team asking for in this moment?
  2. Are you the best person to provide that type of help?
  3. If not, how can you help them find it?
Are you a Disciplemaking Coach or Mentor?

Are you a Disciplemaking Coach or Mentor?

What is the difference?

In his book Sending Well, Dino Senesi differentiates the unique ways coaches and mentors, or consultants, operate: Coaches “Draw Out” while Mentors “Pour In”.

If you find your-self desiring to help disciples, or disciplemakers you are coaching by “drawing out” the best path forward, then you might want to explore the upcoming Disciplemaking Collective.

We will give you a sneak-peak of what to expect in the Disciplemaking Collective, meet the Disciplemaking Collective Training Team and have a chance to interact on the questions you need answered.

Disciplemaking Collective Overview WEBINAR

Can you block-out 35 minutes on March 5 @ 2:30pm PST/5:30pm EST for this important FREE informational webinar to learn more about the Disciplemaking Collective?

Please register here to confirm your spot and write “Disciplemaking Collective Overview” in the Message box. Click Disciplemaking Collective Overview Login to enter the webinar.

Thank you for your continued passion and commitment to developing the healthiest, disciple-making movements possible. We’re looking forward to supporting you in every way we can.

The Disciplemaking Coaching Collective Training Team!

Gary Reinecke – Church Health Coach Facilitator

Daniel Bethel – Missionary & Disciple-Making Catalyst

Guiding Disciplemaking Coaches to Ride the Rails

Guiding Disciplemaking Coaches to Ride the Rails

Developing followers of Christ is like two rails of a train track. First, disciplemaking is the strategic side of helping a person follow Jesus. Second, coaching is the relational side of helping a person follow Jesus.

Coaching has evolved from an intuitive activity to a science. Discipleship sits in a similar continuum with “organic” and “programmic” approaches to spiritual strategy offering different perspectives on relational development. Combining effective coaching with a sound approach to discipleship often yields amazing results, with many individuals guided by this philosophy ultimately developing into followers of Jesus.

After listening to many leaders over the course of my career, I have discovered that coaching and disciplemaking perfectly complement one another.

What does it take to become a Disciplemaking Coach?

Listening to the Holy Spirit and asking powerful, thought provoking questions is central to the Disciplemaking Coach. 

Here are two rails the Disciplemaking Coach rides:

1. The Developmental Rail

The Disciplemaking Rail using the Storyboard  – the developmental path a person navigates on the discipleship journey.

2. The Coaching Rail

The Coaching Rail using the 5Rs – the path a coach travels as they interact with a disciple(s).

Recently, my family and I were sharing a meal with some new friends. The question of spirituality came up. My natural urge to offer my perspectives was managed by my more powerful desire to help these new friends take the next step on their spiritual pilgrimage to Jesus. Instead of sharing my nuggets of gold, I listened and asked questions. By allowing our friends space to discover the truth of Jesus for themselves, the conversation resulted in an invitation to another meal, where we will continue to explore the questions that matter most.

The Disciplemaking Collective is designed to give attention to both rails by providing:

1. Real-time learning to help you navigate the developmental path a person travels on their discipleship journey

2. Coach-skill development based on a Online Coach Assessment you administer with at least one disciple you have coached in the past.

Save the date! Please block-out 55 minutes on March 5 @ 2:30pm PST/5:30pm EST in your calendars for this important informational webinar to learn more about the Disciplemaking Collective. 

Thank you for your commitment to make more & better disciples; by creating the healthiest church environments possible.

Why is it important to help leaders reflect?

Why is it important to help leaders reflect?

I was coaching a leader recently and asked him what he is learning about himself. He paused, then shared:

I am learning the importance of taking time to slow down, reflect and see the progress I’ve made.

It is interesting, the more we “advance” as a species, the more we seem to need time and space to reflect.

Further, he went on to say:

Our coaching time together is the only time I slow down and reflect.

Why do you think that this is the case?

My hunch is that our fast-paced society is not conducive to slowing down and reflection.  I can use all sorts of excuses, but I hold to the truth, the things I value are the things I actually do!  One of my goals is to re-think my rythms for 2018.

Here is a helpful resource to learn how to manage the internal urges that we all have, to stay busy and in a non-reflective state.  The Emotional Intelligence profile will give you and those you coach a starting point on addressing this important area.  I’ve used this assessment on numerous occasions and it oftentimes kick-start a fruitful conversation on ways to be more self-aware to the need to be more reflective.

Check out InFocus Collectives 2018:

Collectives create the time and space for leaders to slow down, reflect – then arrive at new ways of thinking and doing.

10% discount for registrations prior to January 1, 2018