What gets rewarded gets done – 5 questions to reflect on the “win” for your ministry

What gets rewarded gets done – 5 questions to reflect on the “win” for your ministry

Current Champion League Champs, Liverpool FC with their manager Jurgen Klopp, celebrated a historic fifth championship last year (the tournament started in 1956).  This year they won the English Premiership (arguable the most competitive league in the world) with the following accomplishments, if they continue their dominance in the weeks ahead:

  • the most points ever earned by a team
  • the most wins
  • the greatest margin between themselves and their nearest rivals, during the modern era.

Their celebration affirmed their supremacy in the footballing (aka soccer) world.  What is the genius behind Klopp’s approach?  His trademark hugs to players when coming off the field, following a match and winning trophies go a long way in affirming what he values.  But there is something more going on here.

In a recent Men in Blazers interview with Klopp, he was asked what really matters.  His response was noteworthy – I summarize here.  At the end of our lives I don’t believe we will be asked how many trophies we’ve won; however, I do think it matters what we have done with what we were given.  Absolutely, every day I strive to make the most of every opportunity.  What matters for me is that my players have given their best every time they step on the field.

This is what Klopp is affirming.  The wins, trophies make a difference; but it is the mentality of “leaving everything on the field”, is what matters most.  And is one reason Liverpool FC is the dominate club in the world today!

Back in my seminary days (1985-1988) I distinctly remember a chapel service when a guest speaker, George Patterson, come in to share his methodology of disciplemaking.  The speaker was energetic and engaging – disarming in his presentation style.  Most of all – CHALLENGING “the win” for missionaries, church planters and pastors. 

George Patterson was a missionary in Honduras where he discovered a radical (meaning “root” or “returning to the foundation of something) approach to disciplemaking and church multiplication.

Read more about George Patterson

George Patterson spent 21 years in Central America training pastors to make disciples in a New Testament fashion that rapidly multiplies churches. In Honduras he began by training pastors in a traditional, resident Bible Institute with poor results. With the advice of more experienced missionaries and much trial and error, he later saw churches multiply through the instrumentality of “Theological Education and Evangelism by Extension” (TEEE). This non-formal pastoral training resulted in about 100 new churches over twenty years in northern Honduras. This is as a result of the Biblical discipleship and church reproduction principles Dr. Patterson implemented. This model is now used with similar results in Asia, Africa and Latin America, as well in the United States, and is distributed as Train & Multiply TM. George’s teaching style relies heavily on student involvement in role-plays and exercises that bring learning to life. He is hilarious and hyper-energetic in the classroom.

George was “rewarding” or affirming disciples who were making disciples AND planting churches through their disciplemaking efforts.  It was inspiring and captivating.  Near the end he role modeled an exercise that involved students as he went through the 5-step disciplemaking/leadership development process:

  1. I do – you watch
  2. You do – with me
  3. You do – I watch
  4. You do – without me
  5. You do – with someone else

Church Multiplication Guide by George Patterson & Richard Scoggins

George clearly communicated the “win”: disciples making disciples + churches planting churches.  His explanation communicated that these outcomes were celebrated, affirmed and rewarded in culturally appropriate ways.

I will never forget this principle.

Closer to home, we might “reward” behaviors or achievements in ministry: baptisms, budget and buildings.  Whatever those things are – we intentionally or unintentionally exalt or lift-up. Certain things recieve more air-time and attention, than others.

I remember the story a pastor shared, illustrating the importance he and the congregation at his previous church placed on Sunday morning worship attendance.  The pastor set a numerical goal for the year for new visitors to attend a worship service.  The morning of the final count the pastor realized he was 1 person short of their goal.  He explained how he went to the local gas station the morning of, and convinced an employee to join him and attend service that morning.  The employee did so and the congregation celebrated that accomplishment of the milestone together.

You might not reward Sunday morning worship attendance.  But you might take a look at how your people are demonstrating behaviors of a disciple.  Here is a short list of disciplemaking characteristics you might track:

  • Compassion
  • Sharing faith
  • Acts of Service
  • Sacrificial Giving
  • Humility

Whatever that thing is, it is important for people to see what you and your church affirm, prioritize and reward.

5 questions to reflect on the “win” for your ministry

  1. How would you describe a “win” in your ministry?
  2. What are you rewarding in ministry?
  3. How are you rewarding people when they “win”?
  4. If your current “win” is not in alignment with your vision, what needs to change?
  5. What step can you take to affirm the “win” in your ministry, this week?
Great Small Groups do these 2 things with excellence

Great Small Groups do these 2 things with excellence

Of all the areas that will contribute to a healthy church, small groups are one of the most impactful. In fact, in the book Natural Church Development, under the section of Holistic Small Groups, you will discover an interesting factoid based on the data measuring over 170 variables. The most important element contributing to the growth of the church, based on over 4.2 million survey answers, is the multiplication of small groups. It is the environment where all of the elements of a healthy church interplay. Below are two things great small groups do to make more and better disciples.

Provide Excellent Pastoral Care

We can tell story after story from our church community of how people have been cared for during difficult times in their life. Helping a cancer patient die with dignity, supporting a newly widowed mom through the sudden loss of her husband – while still caring for her young ones, loving divorced spouses to move on, helping a parent hope again after losing a child; and the list goes on and on. The beauty is the first person, people in our church call when they are in need is their small group leader OR better yet, members of their small group.

Robust Leadership Development Process

Highly relational coaches provide the support, encouragement and training to develop small group leaders in our church community. We have an orientation session that lasts a couple of hours for new small group leaders. But training happens “just in time” as leaders lead their group.  I’ve found that the periodic calls we receive from our coach gives the level of support needed in about 90% of the situations we find ourselves. The remaining 10% need pastoral intervention when the situation warrants it; but that is not the norm.

Recently we kicked-off the fall Small Group season in our church community. You can see more of what we do in small groups when you CLICK HERE. When I asked our pastor, Steve Redden, the key to the small group DNA at Crosspoint he said two things stand out:

  1. From day one, small groups were the priority and no other ministries compete on the same evening as small groups.
  2. From day one, Steve has led a small group focused on new people with the intent of handing leadership over to an emerging leader from the group, so that he and his wife can start a new group.

Small groups that provide excellent pastoral care and a robust leadership development process are contributing to the vision – more and better disciples.  Multiplication at the most fundamental level of disciplemaking and small groups is a good thing!  These helpful tips are intended for you if you are wondering where to start or the next step you need to take to move your small group ministry forward.

NEW BOOK RECOMMENDATION – The Church Planting Journey

NEW BOOK RECOMMENDATION – The Church Planting Journey

Thirty years ago, you would have searched hard to find a resource on church planting.  There were a few; but one of the first resources to have had broad appeal was The Church Planter’s Toolkit by Bob Logan & Steve Ogne.  This work set the standard for all of the church planting resources to follow.

If you conduct a search today on Amazon, you will find more than 1,000 titles on the topic.  Many of them are worth reading.  Few are worth referring back to again and again.

The Church Planting Journey by Bob Logan is an important read.  It is the updated version of “The Toolkit”,  You will want to digest this information and refer back to if your are a(n):

  • aspiring church planter
  • new church planter
  • veteran church planter
  • parent church leaders
  • coach of church planters

I know, church planting feels like it is a new idea.  Look into church history and you will find all lasting revivals had a multiplication movement of organic church planting at it’s core.  Go further back, you will find the blueprint for the mission of the church in the book of Acts.

With so much literature available today on the topic, I would suggest that, The Church Planting Journey is the one you will want to have on your shelf.

Effective Leadership Facebook LIVE Event

Effective Leadership Facebook LIVE Event

There is so much on the topic of leadership that it is overwhelming to know where to start. If you feel overwhelmed and don’t know where to start; help is not that far away. Over the last 30+ years I’ve learned that leaders need two things to grow:

1.)  A clear picture of their strengths and weaknesses
2.)  A clear developmental path to follow

In this free webinar you will learn the essential areas for a leader to develop and a path to follow to grow your skills.

CLICK HERE for more information.

Smaller (much SMALLER) Churches Prevail + Bigger (much BIGGER) Churches are Needed

Smaller (much SMALLER) Churches Prevail + Bigger (much BIGGER) Churches are Needed

My wife Gina is a health coach.  One of the challenges she faces in working with clients is their ability to hear that 80% of weight loss is based on what you put in your mouth.  The other 20% is exercise.  Many times, it is like that bit of information is lost in translation.  Instead of putting the focus where it needs to be (food intake) the emphasis is placed on increasing the level of activity – exercise.

It is kind of like going to a church multiplication conference and walking away with a list of things that should be done and neglecting the need to shift the culture of the church.  Culture shift is a much more complicated, riskier and problematic exercise.

An intriguing study was released in March 2019 from Exponential by LifeWay Research entitled: “Small, Struggling Congregations Fill U.S. Church Landscape” (used with permission).  The article highlights some of the findings that will confirm, or contrast with, what you sense is happening with the church in America.  Essentially, the trend remains stable with about 72% of the congregations remaining about the same, or showing slight increases in growth, as the graphs above suggest.

I’ve tracked this trend over the last 30+ years.  It is disheartening to read that the situation is not changing.  But I also have two reasons to be hopeful.

  1. Smaller (much SMALLER) Churches Prevail
  2. Bigger (much BIGGER) Churches are Needed

First, the data suggest that small churches are more effective at making disciples of people far from God.

Forty-six percent of smaller churches (fewer than 50 in worship services) say they had 10 conversions or more for every 100 in attendance, while only 18 percent of churches 250 and above meet that benchmark.

My experience supports this, along with research beyond the US, from the international community (see “Is Bigger Really Better?  The Statistics actually Say NO!” by Neil Cole)  My observation is that small churches should remain evangelistically effective by making disciples through the reproduction of disciplemaking communities.  Culturally, the US is less receptive to creating a culture of multiplication for reasons that I won’t go into here; but the fact remains, the single most important question, that surfaces through the international data from Natural Church Development is an affirmative response to this issue:

Our church consciously promotes the multiplication of small groups through cell division?

It is sort of like when people go to Gina, my wife, the health coach.  When she explains to clients in order to lose weight “you must eat healthy and introduce exercise incrementally” there is dissonance.  The external response is often at odds with the internal response!

Second, we need more bigger churches – much BIGGER!

The mega-church in the US has traditionally, and continues, to attract the low-lying fruit (people looking for a church home who are for the most part, already followers of Christ).  In 2018 the largest congregation in the US had 43,000 people in worship services on a weekly basis – CLICK HERE for more information vs. the top 20 largest congregations worldwide with worship service attendance starting at 250,000+ through regional house church networks – CLICK HERE for more information (albeit dated, but still relevant for my purpose).  In the future, I predict the large church will be re-defined by two characteristics in the US:

  • Disciplemaking communities with the DNA of multiplication that will reproduce into the third, fourth and fifth generation
  • Regional churches of hundreds of thousands of disciples of Jesus vs. tens of thousands we currently see

This is what we have been learning from the international church.  However, the ramifications are much more significant than what we can imagine.  My experience suggests that until the pain reaches a tipping point where the way we are making disciples and planting churches really and truly is not working OR the resources are no longer available – change will be constrained to the pioneers

Here are three broad changes that are and will continue to occur in the future:

  1. Simplify requirements of leaders – namely denominations
  2. More relevant training processes to development leaders – namely seminaries
  3. Proliferation of bi-vocational leaders – namely the local church

Each of these are hotly debated among denominations, seminaries and local congregations. Humanly speaking, If data alone drove change, then change would have happened long ago,  Ultimately, apart from the miraculous work of God, the driving force will be the resources required to run these institutions.  What gives me hope, and prayerfully excites you, assuming you’ve stayed with me so far; is that the next generation and the generation after that are looking for deep change AND the Lord of the Harvest is using institutions that have traditionally been unwilling to change, display an openness to change.  A number of examples can be given in each of the three categories above on large and small scales – but the window of change is opening.

Here are two examples of what I mean:

  • More relational approaches to make disciples and develop leaders through coaching:
    • Every notable church planting network, mission agency and reproducing church has embraced the power of coaching.
  • Simplifying and creating relevant delivery systems for higher education:
    • Fuller Theological Seminary is downsizing their geographic footprint to reallocate resources to reach more students through online delivery systems and making degreed programs fully accessible to leaders around the world, in a manner that would not be possible if they had remained in their Pasadena location.

These examples are like the story of so many of Gina’s clients.  The pain and discomfort of remaining in an unhealthy state is overshadowed by their desire for a healthy existence.  When they reach that tipping point, deep change begins.

May the Lord give us insight and wisdom to seize the opportunity sooner rather than later.

Change Management Resources:

 

 

 

Why people are done with church!

Why people are done with church!

When Josh Packard asked his subjects why they had left church, he found the top four reasons were:

  1. they wanted community… and got judgment;
  2. they wanted to affect the life of the church… and got bureaucracy;
  3. they wanted conversation… and got doctrine;
  4. they wanted meaningful engagement with the world… and got moral prescription.

A lot of research has been conducted to alert church leaders why people in modern society are leaving the church in record numbers.  This list gets at some important issues facing the mission of the local church today.  Read more at: To the Dones and the Almost Dones, I hear you by Michael Frost.

InFocus is offering two LIVE courses beginning in April.  Who do you know that would benefit from one of the following: