A New Commandment

A New Commandment

Christ’s “mandate” is commemorated on Maundy Thursday—“maundy” being a shortened form of mandatum (Latin), which means “command.” It was on the Thursday of Christ’s final week before being crucified and resurrected that He said these words to his disciples:

“A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another” (John 13:34).

It is a solemn time for people of Faith.  Jesus supped with his disciples, washed their feet and warned them of what was about to come.  In our rush to move to Sunday with the anticipation of Christ’s resurrection we can miss this critical moment in time.

Several years ago I was asked to play THE part for our church’s dramatic presentation of the Lord’s Supper on Maundy Thursday.  I memorized and recited the John 16 passage, word for word, verse by verse.  Through that exercise I lived the Last Supper in my mind and with my co-actors.  It became more and more real to me the closer we approached the evening of the performance.

I remember the solemn posture I took as I embodied His words.  I imagined the humility that was required of Jesus that night.  The fear that must have surrounded his thoughts.  But in the midst of all of that, he embodied the essence of his life in a new command: “that you love one another: just as I have loved you.”  A message our world so desperately needs to embrace today!

As we pause to reflect today on what Jesus did, let’s not forget His exhortation to pass on the love that comes through His life, His grace and His love.

Two weeks before we launch the Discipleship Collective

Two weeks before we launch the Discipleship Collective

In case you missed the Disciplemaking Collective Overview and would like the view it – click here.

Two weeks from today we launch the Disciple Collective on Monday, April 2 @ 3:30pm PST, 6:30pm EST.  The Collective is designed for a pastor, church planter or lay person who is serious about making disciples but could use a more comprehensive approach combined with the relational support of a coach.  If you have someone in your team, congregation and/or network that fits this description, please forward this blog to them:

Three qualities of a Disciplemaking Collective participant:

  1. Hungry – engaged in the Harvest.
  2. Humble – eager to learn.
  3. Smart – emotionally aware.

These qualities were identified in The Ideal Team Player by Patrick Lencioni; and provide a helpful description of who would make a good candidate for the Disciplemaking Collective.

How is coaching different?

How is coaching different?

Leaders want to know what is different about coaching.

I was asked this question recently and I gave my standard answers – click here.  I like the illustration of wearing hats. When I am using a coach approach I have my “coaching hat” on. But when the focus shifts to another approach like counselor, adviser, teacher or mentor; I should be aware the leader may not see the shift they are asking me to make OR, that they may need help finding the assistance they really need OR, explain that I am willing to switch my “coaching” hat for some other hat.

The clearer we can be, the more confident people become when the shift occurs during a conversation. This is especially helpful when using a coach approach in disciplemaking and church planting/multiplication to avoid confusion, for the coach and the person being coached. I found the chart illustrated in Sending Well: A Field Guide to Great Church Planter Coaching by Dino Sinesi – to be extremely helpful to make the distinctions between coaching and other people-helping approaches. He breaks down the different roles in three categories: Function, Key Word & Scripture.

Here are the Roles with the Function and Key Word describing the outcome each role provides:

  • Counselor: ER DoctorRelief
  • Advisor: Auto MechanicSolutions
  • Teacher: LibrarianInformation
  • Mentor: Personal TrainerImitation
  • Coach: Taxi DriverService

Reflect on these for a moment.

Below are three questions to help you clarify what approach is needed, and if you need to change your “coaching hat”…

  1. What kind of assistance is the leader/team asking for in this moment?
  2. Are you the best person to provide that type of help?
  3. If not, how can you help them find it?
Are you a Disciplemaking Coach or Mentor?

Are you a Disciplemaking Coach or Mentor?

What is the difference?

In his book Sending Well, Dino Senesi differentiates the unique ways coaches and mentors, or consultants, operate: Coaches “Draw Out” while Mentors “Pour In”.

If you find your-self desiring to help disciples, or disciplemakers you are coaching by “drawing out” the best path forward, then you might want to explore the upcoming Disciplemaking Collective.

We will give you a sneak-peak of what to expect in the Disciplemaking Collective, meet the Disciplemaking Collective Training Team and have a chance to interact on the questions you need answered.

Disciplemaking Collective Overview WEBINAR

Can you block-out 35 minutes on March 5 @ 2:30pm PST/5:30pm EST for this important FREE informational webinar to learn more about the Disciplemaking Collective?

Please register here to confirm your spot and write “Disciplemaking Collective Overview” in the Message box. Click Disciplemaking Collective Overview Login to enter the webinar.

Thank you for your continued passion and commitment to developing the healthiest, disciple-making movements possible. We’re looking forward to supporting you in every way we can.

The Disciplemaking Coaching Collective Training Team!

Gary Reinecke – Church Health Coach Facilitator

Daniel Bethel – Missionary & Disciple-Making Catalyst